TRAPPINGS

Outfits and queer things.

Above Rock Lake. Algonquin Park, 08/14.

And now: it is easy to forget
what I came for
among so many who have always
lived here
swaying their crenellated fans
between the reefs
and besides
you breathe differently down here.

I came to explore the wreck.
The words are purposes.
The words are maps.
I came to see the damage that was done
and the treasures that prevail.
I stroke the beam of my lamp
slowly along the flank
of something more permanent
than fish or weed

the thing I came for:
the wreck and not the story of the wreck
the thing itself and not the myth
the drowned face always staring
toward the sun
the evidence of damage
worn by salt and sway into this threadbare beauty
the ribs of the disaster
curving their assertion
among the tentative haunters.

—from Adrienne Rich, “Diving into the Wreck”

lesbianregreat:

Lavender Menace - Lesbian Feminism
Frustrated by Cold War policies, oppressive political institutions, racism and antiquated sexual ideas and gender roles, the 1960’s marked the emergence of American “counterculture.” Americans began actively protesting for social justice, human rights and equality and challenging traditional social norms and values. Lesbians, many of whom were active in organizations for civil rights, women’s equality and gay liberation, found themselves at the forefront of these changes- yet without mutual support from their cohorts. Despite the “radical” nature of the time, ingrained sexist and homophobic attitudes in many groups marginalized and silenced lesbian voices.
The lack of support for lesbian perspectives, issues and political views resulted in the emergence of lesbian feminism. Lesbian feminists shed light on the connections between feminism, women’s rights and gay liberation, while also critiquing the movements for their failure to acknowledge lesbian politics.
This was not the first time lesbian women had began organizing for lesbian rights. After World War II, lesbian communities increasingly developed throughout the United States. For the first time in history, women were able to support themselves financially without a husband; many lesbians embraced this change and opted to work outside the home rather than getting married (Gibson, Alexander and Meem 56). However, homosexuality was understood as a mental illness or a sign of deviance and thus, considered a threat to heteronormative society (Ellis and Peel 198).
Lesbians were persecuted, hospitalized and faced hostility and discrimination. Although select underground nightclubs and restaurants offer lesbians space to congregate, these spaces were highly secretive, primarily located in urban areas, and were subject to public police raids (Gibson, Alexander and Meem 53).
(via Lavender Menace | lovely rants)

lesbianregreat:

Lavender Menace - Lesbian Feminism

Frustrated by Cold War policies, oppressive political institutions, racism and antiquated sexual ideas and gender roles, the 1960’s marked the emergence of American “counterculture.” Americans began actively protesting for social justice, human rights and equality and challenging traditional social norms and values. Lesbians, many of whom were active in organizations for civil rights, women’s equality and gay liberation, found themselves at the forefront of these changes- yet without mutual support from their cohorts. Despite the “radical” nature of the time, ingrained sexist and homophobic attitudes in many groups marginalized and silenced lesbian voices.

The lack of support for lesbian perspectives, issues and political views resulted in the emergence of lesbian feminism. Lesbian feminists shed light on the connections between feminism, women’s rights and gay liberation, while also critiquing the movements for their failure to acknowledge lesbian politics.

This was not the first time lesbian women had began organizing for lesbian rights. After World War II, lesbian communities increasingly developed throughout the United States. For the first time in history, women were able to support themselves financially without a husband; many lesbians embraced this change and opted to work outside the home rather than getting married (Gibson, Alexander and Meem 56). However, homosexuality was understood as a mental illness or a sign of deviance and thus, considered a threat to heteronormative society (Ellis and Peel 198).

Lesbians were persecuted, hospitalized and faced hostility and discrimination. Although select underground nightclubs and restaurants offer lesbians space to congregate, these spaces were highly secretive, primarily located in urban areas, and were subject to public police raids (Gibson, Alexander and Meem 53).

(via Lavender Menace | lovely rants)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Posters and Propaganda You May Have Missed
1988 National Coming Out Day Poster
* (Left to Right, Top)James Baldwin, Willa Cather, Errol Flynn, Michelangelo, Edna St. Vincent Millay
* (Left to Right, Bottom) Cole Porter, Elanor Roosevelt, Bessie Smith, Walt Witman, Virginia Woolf
 

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Posters and Propaganda You May Have Missed

1988 National Coming Out Day Poster

* (Left to Right, Top)James Baldwin, Willa Cather, Errol Flynn, Michelangelo, Edna St. Vincent Millay

* (Left to Right, Bottom) Cole Porter, Elanor Roosevelt, Bessie Smith, Walt Witman, Virginia Woolf

 

"He soon adopted the system of the London beau monde — to do everything in the most dandyish fashion possible; and his cultivated mind endeavoured to defend this mode of living as the only genuine system of human existence.”

"He soon adopted the system of the London beau monde — to do everything in the most dandyish fashion possible; and his cultivated mind endeavoured to defend this mode of living as the only genuine system of human existence.”