TRAPPINGS

Outfits and queer things.

queerkystyle:

Blazer - ASOS Men’s slim fit

Sweater - Zara Women’s

Pants - Zara Women’s

Shoes - Nine West Women’s

Shoulder Bag - Matt & Nat

Socks - J Crew

Scarf - Zara

therumpus:


I owe a lot to the Rumpus—specifically, the Self-Made Man column and the writing community I met there. Self-Made Mancame about because I moved from San Francisco to New England a few years ago and started my transition the next week in terms of hormones. So pretty immediately I was in a space where I felt very alien because I had left a whole life and community in San Francisco and moved across the country. I had a major transition physically and socially and it was just a lot to deal with at once. One thing that was really hard when I started my transition was that normally in that kind of situation I would look online or in books and find myself reflected back to me but I was having trouble finding that. I wasn’t seeing a lot of stories about people who transitioned after 30, but I was also interested in having a different kind of conversation about not just transitioning but about gender in general. I’m a really spiritual person and a universalist so what I was experiencing was a lot of points of connection. I was really connecting to pregnant women who were also going through massive changes physically and who weren’t sure what their identities would be on the other side. I was also talking to people making massive career and life changes. I was talking with people who were coming up against ideas about what it means to be a man or woman in the world and navigate the world socially during huge life moments and I was finding a lot of solace in those connections in real life, but I wasn’t seeing that reflected in larger narratives about my experience. In general, I was seeing a lot of cleaving, othering narratives about being trans. I started Self-Made Man because I wanted to write about what it was like to go through a real-time transition, and navigating the world from a place of finding connection with all kinds of people and exploring that in a meditative way. Everyone at the Rumpus was really great about all of it and got behind me the whole time. The whole community connected to the Rumpus is wonderful and it’s such a labor of love. Everyone writes for free which I think is why everyone is so committed to everything that goes on the site and the relationship with the site and each other. The concept of the column was that these connections exist and transcend our bodies and that’s what my experience of the community at the Rumpus has been.

The Rumpus Interview With Thomas Page McBee

therumpus:

I owe a lot to the Rumpus—specifically, the Self-Made Man column and the writing community I met there. Self-Made Mancame about because I moved from San Francisco to New England a few years ago and started my transition the next week in terms of hormones. So pretty immediately I was in a space where I felt very alien because I had left a whole life and community in San Francisco and moved across the country. I had a major transition physically and socially and it was just a lot to deal with at once. One thing that was really hard when I started my transition was that normally in that kind of situation I would look online or in books and find myself reflected back to me but I was having trouble finding that. I wasn’t seeing a lot of stories about people who transitioned after 30, but I was also interested in having a different kind of conversation about not just transitioning but about gender in general. I’m a really spiritual person and a universalist so what I was experiencing was a lot of points of connection. I was really connecting to pregnant women who were also going through massive changes physically and who weren’t sure what their identities would be on the other side. I was also talking to people making massive career and life changes. I was talking with people who were coming up against ideas about what it means to be a man or woman in the world and navigate the world socially during huge life moments and I was finding a lot of solace in those connections in real life, but I wasn’t seeing that reflected in larger narratives about my experience. In general, I was seeing a lot of cleaving, othering narratives about being trans. I started Self-Made Man because I wanted to write about what it was like to go through a real-time transition, and navigating the world from a place of finding connection with all kinds of people and exploring that in a meditative way. Everyone at the Rumpus was really great about all of it and got behind me the whole time. The whole community connected to the Rumpus is wonderful and it’s such a labor of love. Everyone writes for free which I think is why everyone is so committed to everything that goes on the site and the relationship with the site and each other. The concept of the column was that these connections exist and transcend our bodies and that’s what my experience of the community at the Rumpus has been.

The Rumpus Interview With Thomas Page McBee





Hi! It’s getting cold outside, so I’m wondering: are you a small(ish) masculine person struggling to find a warm menswear parka that doesn’t swallow you whole?
This winter, I sprung for a new coat, so I’m retiring my old Columbia parka. It’s still got a lot of life left in it, though, so I’ve put it up on eBay — but I’d rather know that the coat was keeping a small transmasculine person warm this winter than make a few extra bucks in cash. If any of you folks are interested, I’d be happy to waive the eBay price and send it to you for just the cost of shipping.
As for the jacket itself: I live in Canada and it kept me warm and dry through at least one polar vortex, so I’d say it’s pretty warm. It’s hardly the smallest coat out there, but it *was the first winter coat I ever found in the men’s section that fit me. Maybe it will fit you, too!
For reference, I’m 5’8” and about 125lbs: this coat fits me well enough, but it’s still a bit roomy. If you’re a smaller guy, though, this might not be the coat for you. Exact measurements are in the eBay ad, and I’ll gladly remeasure or answer any other questions you might have if you’re interested.
In any case, I hope you all find what you need to stay warm this winter. Cheers!
-a

Hi! It’s getting cold outside, so I’m wondering: are you a small(ish) masculine person struggling to find a warm menswear parka that doesn’t swallow you whole?

This winter, I sprung for a new coat, so I’m retiring my old Columbia parka. It’s still got a lot of life left in it, though, so I’ve put it up on eBay — but I’d rather know that the coat was keeping a small transmasculine person warm this winter than make a few extra bucks in cash. If any of you folks are interested, I’d be happy to waive the eBay price and send it to you for just the cost of shipping.

As for the jacket itself: I live in Canada and it kept me warm and dry through at least one polar vortex, so I’d say it’s pretty warm. It’s hardly the smallest coat out there, but it *was the first winter coat I ever found in the men’s section that fit me. Maybe it will fit you, too!

For reference, I’m 5’8” and about 125lbs: this coat fits me well enough, but it’s still a bit roomy. If you’re a smaller guy, though, this might not be the coat for you. Exact measurements are in the eBay ad, and I’ll gladly remeasure or answer any other questions you might have if you’re interested.

In any case, I hope you all find what you need to stay warm this winter. Cheers!

-a